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* The Retreat Of Our National Drama

by Julian Meyrick
Published 1st May READ MORE

JULIAN MEYRICK is Professor of Creative Arts, Flinders University and a theatre director and scholar. He has directed many award-winning productions, most recently the 2012 Helpmann winner, Angela’s Kitchen. He has published widely on Australian theatre, cultural policy and contemporary dramaturgy and is completing a series of case studies on the relationship between creative practice and arts funding.

* Networking: Commercial Television in Australia, A History by Nick Herd

The latest review praises the book's extensive research and thoughtful treatment of issues.
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Published by Currency House

* Enlightenment or Entitlement? Rethinking tertiary music education

by Peter Tregear
PUBLISHED 1st FEBRUARY
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Platform Paper 38

PETER TREGEAR is a prize-winning performer, author and music academic. A doctoral graduate of King’s College Cambridge, he has held teaching positions in both the UK and Australia. In July 2012 he was appointed Head of School and Professor of Music at the School of Music of the Australian National University.

* Not at a Cinema Near You

PUBLISHED 1ST NOVEMBER
Lauren Carroll Harris

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PLATFORM PAPERS

book

Title

Body for Hire? The State of Dance in Australia

Author

Amanda Card

Platform Paper Issue#

08

ISBN13

9780975730150

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PREVIEW

Product Description

Platform Papers subscriptions for 1 year ($60) or 2 years ($120) are available online or download the Subscription Form here

PUBLISHED APRIL 2006

Once dancers joined ballet, modern dance groups or chorus lines and did what they were directed to do, writes Amanda Card. Today the art is more collaborative, at least in the contemporary dance field, but there are too many graduating students and little steady work, few auditions and decreasing opportunity for newcomers. The best dancers today are ‘bodies for hire’, those who are versatile, open-minded, independent and comfortable in every genre. Choreography has become a more democratic process in which dancers, choreographer and directors come to depend on each other. In her guide to the future of dance in Australia Amanda proposes the disbandment of failing dance company structures in favour of the free sharing of the talents of artists, members of a ‘super group’ under the management of creative producers or a new breed of artistic directors.

Dr Amanda Card spent her professional career as a dancer with Kinetic Energy, on the commercial dance circuit in Sydney, Japan and South-East Asia, and as a member of Human Veins Dance Theatre. She was the inaugural Chair of Critical Path, Sydney’s choreographic research and development centre. and currently teaches movement studies at the University of Sydney.

Published with the support of the Keir Foundation